presenting & sharing

[conferences]

Cheng, C., & Sawaya. S. (2015, March). So Near Yet So Far Away: Transactional Distance in Synchronous Hybrid Learning Environments. Symposium presentation presented at the 26th annual meeting of the Society of Information Technology in Teacher Education (SITE). Las Vegas, NV.
Slides | Abstract |

Transactional distance is an important factor that influences learning. Moore (1993) defined it as a psychological and communication space of potential misunderstanding between learners and instructors. Technology-mediated learning environments have redefined the scope of transactional distance to include learners’ relationships with other elements, such as the technology and other learners. Synchronous hybrid learning environments further extend learning interactions from a single plane (in either the online or face-to-face environment) to two planes (across the online and face-to-face environments), which presents transactional distance with new challenges. This paper explores the transactional distance of online and face-to-face students in different models of synchronous hybrid learning environments, aiming to examine: (a) whether there is any difference in transactional distance between online and face-to-face students, (b) how students’ transactional distance changes over time, and (c) whether there is a relationship between the model of synchronous hybrid learning environments and students’ transactional distance.

Bell, J., Cain, W. & Sawaya. S. (2015, March). Common Ground in Uncommon Contexts: Towards a Topographic Language for Synchronous Blended/Multi-Access Learning Environments. Symposium presentation presented at the 26th annual meeting of the Society of Information Technology in Teacher Education (SITE). Las Vegas, NV.
Slides | Abstract |

The concept of combining face-to-face and online students for shared learning experiences has gained increased attention from teachers, institutions, and researchers for a variety of reasons. The result has been practices and research that approach this concept from different educational and pedagogical perspectives, and that often employ different terminologies and visual conceptualizations (e.g., Graham, 2006; Bower, 2013; Bell, Sawaya, & Cain, 2014). This paper will provide an overview of these different approaches and identify common themes related to the interactions that take place in these designs. In addition, this paper will place a set of models and topographies developed by researchers at the Design Studio at Michigan State University (Bell, Sawaya, & Cain, 2014) within the existing literature on synchronous blended and multi-access courses.

Cain, W., Sawaya. S., & Bell, J. (2014, March). Introducing the linked classroom model in a synchromodal learning environment. Presented at the 25th annual meeting of the Society of Information Technology in Teacher Education (SITE). Jacksonville, FL.
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In this best practice paper, we will describe one type of Synchromodal Learning Environment: The linked classroom model.  We implemented this model in a Master’s level course at a large Midwestern university as it served the need for two instructors to synchronously teach two groups of students each in a separate geographical location.  While a face-to-face instructor facilitated the face-to-face conversations within each group at each location, we put in place technologies to mediate the synchronous conversations across the groups.  In addition to describing the technological setup, we will also share our design considerations, problems faced, and lessons learned.

Cain, W., Bell, J. & Sawaya, S. (2014, March). Supporting diffusion: Engaging the innovation-decision process for synchromodal class sessions. Presented at the 25th annual meeting of the Society of Information Technology in Teacher Education (SITE). Jacksonville, FL.
| Slides | Abstract |

This best practices paper describes activities and initiatives that engage the innovation-decision process associated with a teaching and technology innovation (known as synchromodal class sessions) at the College of Education at a large Mid-western university in the United States. In particular, this paper will discuss how certain activities engaged faculty members at the knowledge, persuasion, and implementation stages of the innovation-decision process, as well as how they have contributed to the continued diffusion of this innovation by faculty members within the College of Education.

Bell, J., Sawaya, S., & Cain, W. (2013, June). Personal portals and synchromodal learning: Integrating face-to-face and online learners as comparable partners in the same learning experience. Presented at the Michigan State University Information Technology Conference. East Lansing, MI.
Slides | Abstract |

The traditional model of hybrid learning involves alternating class meetings between face-to-face and online modes. A second emerging model of hybrid learning includes both face-to-face and online students as equal partners in the same class sessions, also known as SynchroModal Learning. This presentation will describe and illustrate a range of strategies for SynchroModal learning, including examples from the Educational Psychology and Educational Technology (EPET) Hybrid Ph.D. program in the College of Education. A particular focus will be on the use of personal portals in which each remote participant has his or her own local presence using tools such as the iPad.

[workshops]

Sawaya. S. (2014, October). Revisiting backwards design table. Presented at the Open University China scholar professional development workshop. East Lansing, MI.
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Sawaya. S. (2014, October). Design thinking + universal design for learning. Presented at the Open University China scholar professional development workshop. East Lansing, MI.
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Sawaya. S. (2014, October). Tech time! Communication tools. Presented at the Open University China scholar professional development workshop. East Lansing, MI.
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Sawaya. S. (2014, February). Using mobile devices to connect in-school to out-of-school learning. Presented at the first Master of Arts and Educational Technology (MAET) Mobile Learning Workshop. East Lansing, MI.
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Mobile devices have the potential to connect the learning that goes on within school walls to that which occurs beyond classroom settings. This session will provide you with practical ideas drawn from research for how to create such a seamless learning environment.

Sawaya. S. (2014, February). Designing effective mobile learning activities. Presented at the first Master of Arts and Educational Technology (MAET) Mobile Learning Workshop. East Lansing, MI.
Slides | Abstract |

Incorporating mobile devices in your learning activities needs to be done with much consideration.  This session will introduce you to different strategies you can use to design effective mobile learning activities.

Sawaya. S. (2013, February). Video recording and screen capturing capabilities. Presented at the sixth annual Michigan State University Faculty Technology Showcase. East Lansing, MI.
Slides | Abstract |

As part of my work in the CEPSE/COE design studio, I am responsible for helping faculty members capture their lectures, presentations, meetings, and Skype interviews.  This presentation describes the different tools available for video recording.  It also shows the details of the recording set ups.

[keynotes]

Sawaya, S., & Hartman, D. K. (2014, October). Mobile learning: What is it? How do you design it? How do you do it well? Presented at the Bartin University From Knowledge Technology to Brain Technology workshop. Bartin, Turkey.
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[academic talks]

Mishra, P., Henriksen, D., Sawaya, S., Johnson, A., Sloan, C., & Cain, W. (2013, September). Fostering creativity through design. Presented at the Michigan State University Learning Design and Technology Fall Breakfast Series. East Lansing, MI.
| Abstract |

Come take an exciting journey through CEP 917, an AT&T award winning Blended-Learning course that is all about design.  This course created a unique learning opportunity to explore topics such as knowledge/thinking process of designers, design and technology, evolutionary design, research, learning by design, creativity and much more!  The entire course is a wonderful display of a design in process.

Bell, J., Cain, W., & Sawaya, S. (2013, March). Hybrid learning: Models and technologies. Presented as a college-wide academic talk at the College of Education at Michigan State University. East Lansing, MI.
| Abstract |

The division between face-to-face and online interaction is increasingly blurred, as is illustrated by hybrid learning. One model of hybrid learning involves alternating class meetings between face-to-face and online modes. A second emerging model of hybrid learning includes both face-to-face and online students as equal partners in the same class sessions. Both of these models are being used in the Educational Psychology and Educational Technology (EPET) Hybrid Ph.D. program. This presentation describes a range of strategies for hybrid learning, including examples from the EPET program and live demonstrations of available technologies that make these interactions possible. In addition, initial experiences and findings are shared regarding their varied affordances.

Bell, J., Cain, W., & Sawaya, S. (2013, February). Hybrid learning models and the CEPSE/COE Design Studio’s hybrid learning classroom. Presented at the Explorations in Instructional Technology Michigan State University Brownbag Seminar. East Lansing, MI.
| Abstract |

This presentation describes a range of strategies for hybrid learning, including examples from the EPET program and live demonstrations of available technologies that make these interactions possible. In addition, initial experiences and findings are shared regarding their varied affordances.

Sawaya. S., & Gerard, K. (May, 2012). Reading in the digital age: Transforming strategies and assessments. Presented as part of a series of academic talks at the College of Education at Southwest University. Chongquing, China.
| Slides | Abstract |

As e-readers and other digital tools rise in popularity, the act of reading has been changing in tangent.  This presentation highlights the different strategies for reading print text and digital text.  The affordances of the web and other technologies are also discussed.  The presentation concludes with describing how reading print text is traditionally assessed and ends with thoughts on how reading in the digital age could be assessed.